Alicia Ridings-Young's Page

aridings-young@clarksvilleschools.org

My name is Alicia Ridings-Young and this is my first year teaching at Clarksville High School. I graduated from Purdue University with my degree in Political Science and English in 2010. I then spent a few years working part-time while my children were babies. In 2016, I returned to school at Indiana Wesleyan University, where I pursued my teaching certification. I am very excited to be a part of Clarksville Community School Corporation!

Schedule:

Period 1: English 9

Period 2: English 9

Period 3: English 11

CCR: 10th Grade

Period 4: English 9

Period 5: Plan

Period 6: AP English

Period 7: English 9

 

Syllabus: English 9

Contact Information:

Mrs. Young

Room: B107

Phone: (812) 282-7753

Email: aridings-young@clarksvilleschools.org

 

Welcome!

Hello! My name is Alicia Young and I am excited to be your English/ Language Arts teacher for this year. This syllabus is intended to give you an introduction to the course, as well as to define the expectations for the class. I am always available to answer any questions you might have. Please feel free to contact me. I am looking forward to getting to know you all!

Materials:

Students are responsible for bringing their materials to class every day. Materials include:

  1. Textbook, or any novel assigned to the class
  2. Pen or pencil
  3. Three-ring binder with tabs to separate sections
  4. Loose leaf paper

 

Class Rules

  1. Be respectful. Treat your teacher, your classmates, and school property with respect. Leave people and places better than you found them.
  2. Arrive on time and prepared. Make sure that you have all the materials you need before the bell rings.
  3. Take responsibility for your own learning. Do your own work and do your best.
  4. Follow all of the school rules. This includes: No cell phones and no food or drink in class.
  5. The class may recommend any further rules.

 

 

Tardy Policy

Students should be in class, in their desks when the bell rings. Students may be tardy to class twice during the semester with no penalty. On the third tardy, the student will be issued a warning. Tardies 4-6 will result in a 30-minute detention. Tardies 7-9 will result in a 60-minute detention. Any further tardies will result in In-School Suspension.

 

 

Cell Phones

Students are not permitted to have cell phones out during class.

 

 

 

Grading Procedures

The grades for this class will be determined based on a points system. Each assignment will be worth a certain number of points, depending on the amount of work required by the assignment. Class and homework assignments, on average, are worth 15-20 points, whereas a test may be worth 100-120 points. Projects are usually worth 50-80 points. To determine the percentage grade for each quarter, the student’s earned points will be divided by the total number of points possible for the quarter. The grading scale is as follows:

A: 94-100

A-: 90-93

B+: 87-89

B: 84-86

B-: 80-83

C+: 77-79

C: 74-76

C-: 70-73

D+: 67-69

D: 64-66

D-: 60-63

F: 0-59

Semester Grades: 40% first quarter, 40% second quarter, 20% final exam

 

Bell-Ringers

Students will need to bring loose leaf paper each day, in which they will complete their bell-ringer assignments. Most days, the class will come in to find a bell-ringer assignment on the board. Students should begin working on the assignment as soon as they are seated. These assignments will consist of journals and grammar exercises. They will be turned in during class and will also be included in the students’ binders. Binders will be collected at the end of each quarter. These assignments will be graded for completion.

 

Projects

Each unit will include at least one project for students to complete. Students will have time during class to complete these assignments, but may need to work on them at home if they do not complete them during class time. Projects may be turned in before the due date for feedback from the teacher. After feedback, students may choose to change or improve their projects as many times as they wish before the due date. Students are not required to turn in projects early, but this option is recommended. This option is also available for research papers.

Discussions

Because of the nature of this course, this class will involve a great deal of discussion. Students are encouraged to participate in discussions. Discussion may take place in large or small groups over various works that the class will read. Please keep in mind that it is imperative to be respectful during discussions. You may disagree, but do so respectfully. Remember, leave people and places better than you found them.

Late Work

Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the due date. Assignments turned in later the same day will be accepted for full credit. After the due date, work will still be accepted, with a penalty of 10% off the total points for each day late, up to 50%. If assignments are turned in more than 5 days late, they will still be accepted, but students may only earn a maximum of  half credit. Once grades have been submitted for the grading period, students may no longer turn in assignments.

Absences

Students who miss class may pick up missed work in the folders located in the back corner of the room. Each class will have its own folder. Students may need to retrieve missed notes from a classmate. Students will have one week to turn in any work that was due or missed during their absence. After one week, the penalties for late work will apply.

 

Class Overview

The class will read a variety of texts throughout the course of the year, including essays, short stories, poetry, and novels. Students will learn to comprehend and analyze the various texts. Below you will find a basic plan of the units we will cover.  The units may be moved around, however, depending on the interests and needs of the class.

Unit 1: Short Stories

Unit 2: Nonfiction

Unit 3: The Odyssey

Unit 4: Poetry

Unit 5: Romeo and Juliet

Unit 6: Poetry

Unit 7: To Kill a Mockingbird

During the year, the class will also practice formal and informal writing. The class will practice argumentative, informative, and narrative writing through various writing assignments throughout the literary units. In addition, the class will spend the beginning of the second semester working on a research assignment, in which they will plan a research paper on the topic of their choosing.

During both semesters, the class will also study grammar and parts of speech. Some of the topics that students will master include:

 

Syllabus: English 11

Contact Information:

Mrs. Young

Room: B107

Phone: (812) 282-7753

Email: aridings-young@clarksvilleschools.org

 

Welcome!

Hello! My name is Alicia Young and I am excited to be your English/ Language Arts teacher for this year. This syllabus is intended to give you an introduction to the course, as well as to define the expectations for the class. I am always available to answer any questions you might have. Please feel free to contact me. I am looking forward to getting to know you all!

 

Materials:

Students are responsible for bringing their materials to class every day. Materials include:

  1. Textbook, or any novel assigned to the class
  2. Pen or pencil
  3. Three-ring binder with 3 divider tabs
  4. Loose leaf paper for assignments

 

Class Rules

  1. Be respectful. Treat your teacher, your classmates, and school property with respect. Leave people and places better than you found them.
  2. Arrive on time and prepared. Make sure that you have all the materials you need before the bell rings.
  3. Take responsibility for your own learning. Do your own work and do your best.
  4. Follow all of the school rules. This includes: No cell phones and no food or drink in class.
  5. The class may recommend any further rules.

 

Tardies

Students should be in class, in their desks when the bell rings. Students may be tardy to class twice during the semester with no penalty. On the third tardy, the student will be issued a warning. Tardies 4-6 will result in a 30-minute detention. Tardies 7-9 will result in a 60-minute detention. Any further tardies will result in In-School Suspension.

 

Cell Phones

Students are not permitted to have cell phones out during class.

 

Grading Procedures

The grades for this class will be determined based on a points system. Each assignment will be worth a certain number of points, depending on the amount of work required by the assignment. Class and homework assignments, on average, are worth 15-20 points, whereas a test may be worth 100-120 points. Projects are usually worth 50-80 points. To determine the percentage grade for each quarter, the student’s earned points will be divided by the total number of points possible for the quarter. The grading scale is as follows:

A: 94-100

A-: 90-93

B+: 87-89

B: 84-86

B-: 80-83

C+: 77-79

C: 74-76

C-: 70-73

D+: 67-69

D: 64-66

D-: 60-63

F: 0-59

Semester Grades: 40% first quarter, 40% second quarter, 20% final exam

 

Bell-Ringers

Students will need to bring loose leaf paper each day, on which they will complete their bell-ringer assignments. Most days, the class will come in to find a bell-ringer assignment on the board. Students should begin working on the assignment as soon as they are seated. These assignments will consist of journals and grammar exercises. They will be turned in during each class and also included in the students’ binders. Binders will be collected at the end of each quarter. These assignments will be graded for completion.

 

Vocabulary

Students will be assigned vocabulary words to study as a part of each unit. Each list will consist of 15 to 20 words. Students will take vocabulary quizzes over these words. Vocabulary quizzes will be worth 15-20 points, depending on the number of words on the quiz.

 

Projects

Each unit will include at least one project for students to complete. Students will have time during class to complete these assignments, but may need to work on them at home if they do not complete them during class time. Projects may be turned in before the due date for feedback from the teacher. After feedback, students may choose to change or improve their projects as many times as they wish before the due date. Students are not required to turn in projects early, but this option is recommended. This option is also available for research papers.

Discussions

Because of the nature of this course, this class will involve a great deal of discussion. Students are encouraged to participate in discussions. Discussion may take place in large or small groups over various works that the class will read. Please keep in mind that it is imperative to be respectful during discussions. You may disagree, but do so respectfully. Remember, leave people and places better than you found them.

Late Work

Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the due date. Assignments turned in later the same day will be accepted for full credit. After the due date, work will still be accepted, with a penalty of 10% off the total points for each day late, up to 50%. If assignments are turned in more than 5 days late, they will still be accepted, but students may only earn a maximum of  half credit. Once grades have been submitted for the grading period, students may no longer turn in assignments.

Absences

Students who miss class may pick up missed work in the folders located in the back corner of the room. Each class will have its own folder. Students may need to retrieve missed notes from a classmate. Students will have one week to turn in any work that was due or missed during their absence. After one week, the penalties for late work will apply.

Class Overview

During this course, students will read a variety of texts, including fiction and nonfiction. Students will read and analyze essays, speeches, poetry, short stories, and novels.

Semester 1

Unit 1: Early American Literature

Unit 2: Revolution-Era Literature

Unit 3: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Unit 4: Romanticism and Transcendentalism

Semester 2

Unit 5: Research and the Writing Process

*Research Paper Assigned

Unit 6: Modern Poetry

Unit 7: The Great Gatsby

Unit 8: Contemporary Literature

Unit 9: The Crucible

Students will also complete a variety of  informal and formal writing assignments. These will include narrative, informative, and argumentative writing. During Unit 5, the students will each complete a research paper. The students will have time during class to complete research and work through each step of the writing process.

Students will complete journals and grammar exercises in order to build on their previous writing and grammar skills.

 

AP English 11 Course Syllabus

2017-2018 School Year

Instructor: Mrs. Young

Phone: (812) 282-7753

Email: aridings-young@clarksvilleschools.org

Planning Period: 5th, Room B107

 

Course Description

This course will follow the curricular requirements outlined by the College Board in the AP English Literature and Composition Course Description which focuses on building skills necessary for college-level reading and writing. The texts include works from a variety of time periods and genres, and the writing assignments include in-class essays as well as formal process papers with several opportunities for revision. This is considered a college-level course. That means that you will be asked to read and analyze challenging, provocative, dense, and sometimes controversial material. You will also be expected to come to class prepared to challenge yourself and others with interesting discussion points.

The course design is based on the premise that the AP English Literature exam measures those skills that students need in order to be successful in college. Students will work together and explore a variety of reading and writing strategies so that you all will be prepared for success when it comes time to take the Advanced Placement English Literature exam. The course will focus on improving skill sets related to confidence and facility with language, critical reading, writing, thinking, and success in academic endeavors.

Objectives

By the end of the year, you will be able to use a variety of reading and writing strategies to help you succeed in any future educational endeavors, whether it be completing your high school career or beginning your college career. The goal of this course is to also provide you the ability to utilize critical thinking, exemplary vocabulary skills, and confident presentation skills in a way that will provide you with success in any future academic endeavors.

Materials

 

Core texts include, but are not limited to, the following:

Poetry

We will study the elements of poetry in various examples throughout the year.

Essays

We will study the elements of nonfiction/essay writing in various examples throughout the year.

Novels/Plays

The Awakening by Kate Chopin (novel)

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (novel)

Hamlet by William Shakespeare (play)

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou (novel)

Othello by William Shakespeare (play)

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (novel)

The Stranger by Albert Camus (novel)

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (novel)

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe (novel)

Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank (novel)

Beowulf

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffery Chaucer

Dante’s Inferno

 

Independent Reading:

During the school year students will self-select books to be read as part of their homework. Each book must be approved by me. The books must be on the student’s current reading level, and cannot be a book read previously or a book common to the Language Arts instruction. This assignment is worth 190 points!

Note: please see attached Independent Reading contract, sign, and return.

 

Assessments

Writing

Each student will write several short critical papers that involve explicating poetry and drama, performing a close reading of novels, including one that is research-based. In general, each paper will use specific and well-chosen evidence to articulate an argument about poems, drama, and fiction. Specifically, these critical essays are based on close textual analysis of structure, theme, style (figurative language, imagery, symbolism, tone), and social/historical values. These papers will not only be timed writing (as practice for the AP exam), but also process papers (personal, expository, and argumentative) that will be work shopped (including planning, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading) during class with possible additional work required outside of class. Conferences with me during the writing process will address the issues in your writing such as idea development and argumentation (including the use of specific details from the text), organizational choices, sentence structure and variety, and appropriate word choice and tone for revision purposes.

 

The Great Gatsby– Students will be required to research and write an essay over the themes and nuances of the 1920s that are embedded within The Great Gatsby. Students will be expected to expand on ideas already presented and discussed in class.

Hamlet– students will be required to write an argumentative essay over the two major themes we will discuss in Hamlet. Students will be required to explore the themes of betrayal and revenge in Hamlet. They will be required to find textual evidence that proves which theme is more prevalent and in what ways they are seen within the character’s actions and behaviors. Students will be required to use that textual evidence to support their position in a five paragraph, formal essay.

Research Paper over Important American and British Authors– Students, in order to compile the necessary research, will be required to choose an author from a list compiled by the teacher beforehand. The students should compile research over the author’s influences on society as well as the influences that inspired a select number of novels by their author. Students should include a brief description of the author’s childhood and early adult life, before they became an author. Students will also be required to read a novel by their chosen author, one preferably located within the school library, and complete a project and presentation over the novel.

Things Fall Apart– Students will be required to complete an essay discussing the different cultural  elements and themes located within Things Fall Apart. Students will be required to defend the novel and the author in regards to the themes that it contains and whether or not those themes are relevant to the development of the story.

Students will also have the opportunity to examine released student work from the AP exam to help them understand the rubrics and my expectations for their writing.

Reader Response Journals (RRJs)

As students read the various novels required for the course, they will be required to analyze the novel using guiding questions provided by the instructor. Students will record their responses to these questions in their Reader Response Journals (the steno pads listed in the materials). These will be completed outside of class. There will be multiple Response Journals for each novel.

Practice AP Exams

Each quarter, students will take a practice round of the multiple-choice section of the AP exam. The first practice round will be on the second day of school. These will be used to drive instruction and to assess student learning throughout the year.

 

Vocabulary

Students will receive vocabulary instruction based on not only literary terms and devices, but also vocabulary specific to the works we are studying. This will be assessed not only through quizzes, but students will be required to use this vocabulary in their timed writing and process papers.

Other Assessments

Throughout the year, students will have other assessments including, but not limited to, quizzes, journals, creative writing, annotations, and other assessments as deemed necessary by the instructor.

***Please note this is our goal for the year, but I may need to restructure the course syllabus to meet the needs of the students or time constraints. Once I collaborate with the English department, I do intend on adding at least two more novels and one more play. I will notify you and your parent and/or guardian of the additions to the syllabus as soon as I determine what they will be.

Classroom Expectations

  1. Be respectful. Treat your teacher, your classmates, and school property with respect. Leave people and places better than you found them.
  2. Arrive on time and prepared. Make sure that you have all the materials you need before the bell rings.
  3. Take responsibility for your own learning. Do your own work and do your best.
  4. Follow all of the school rules. This includes: No cell phones and no food or drink in class.
  5. The class may recommend any further rules.

 

Cell Phone Policy

There is to be absolutely NO cell phone use in my classroom. You will receive one warning and then I will confiscate the phone for the period. If it happens more than once, you can pick your phone up from the office at the end of the day and will write an essay about why cell phones are not/should not be allowed in class.

Bullying Policy

I have a zero-tolerance policy for bullying. If I see it, it will result in a written essay, detention time, and a written referral. We are here to learn, which requires understanding and patience. Everyone’s opinion is to be respected and heard.

LATE WORK: There will be absolutely ZERO late work accepted in this class. The only exception to this rule is excused absence. If you missed a due date for a test, project, or paper, it will be turned in the day you return/made up. All notes and assigned assignments must be obtained from myself or another student and turned in the next day.

Absent Work – All papers, projects, and assignments are to be submitted at the beginning of the class period on the day they are due. If you know you will be absent or tardy on a due date, you must submit the assignment early, have someone turn it in for you, or submit it electronically to aridings-young@clarksvilleschools.org.

 

Plagiarism and Cheating

Plagiarism and cheating will not be tolerated in my class. You will receive a zero for your first offense, accompanied with communication to your parents or guardians. Subsequent plagiarism and cheating activities will further be met with zeros, accompanied with written referrals to your discipline file.

 

Grading and Procedure Information

The student’s grade will be based on the student’s performance on tests, quizzes, projects, homework, and class participation. To compute your grade, divide the total number of points earned by the number of points possible.

The AP class does have a weighted grade scale. (For example, a B is actually calculated as an A- on your report card at the end of each semester.) Student progress is evaluated through quizzes, essays, short answer tests, daily homework assignments, research papers (MLA Style), assigned projects, RRJs, and class participation. Students in AP Literature and Composition are encouraged to understand the English classroom as a community of ideas, which means they learn to listen and respond to one another, not just the teacher.

Grading Scale

A = 90-100, B = 80-89, C = 70-79, D = 60-69, F = 0-59

 

Thank you,

 

Alicia Ridings-Young

AP English Teacher

Clarksville High School

Aridings-young@clarksvilleschools.org